Monday, April 17, 2006

Journal Article Proposal

Government regulation of video games will be the primary concern of my article. While some discussion of video game violence will be necessary in order to explain why some feel that government regulation is necessary, but an all-encompassing discussion of the subject will not be necessary. Instead, I will limit myself to research data used specifically in cases for and against government regulation and specific instances of video-game-implicated violence.
Specifically, my article will begin with an overview of current government regulations on the purchasing and selling of video games. This will connect to a list of different regulations in particular states across the country; from Wisconsin’s 5 years of jail time for selling a game containing mature content to a minor, to South Dakota’s lack of video-game related laws. The article will continue on to give another brief overview, this one of numerous outbreaks of youth violence that have been connected to video games, to help to explain exactly why state governments are beginning to closely monitor video game retail.
I will then cover recent developments in video game violence and subsequent government regulations with a focus on prominent figures in the debate and leading perspectives. These range from the extremist, Jack Thompson’s view on complete banning of any and all violent games, to a focus on parental regulation proposed by prominent figures in the gaming community.
This, will be my personal stand on the subject as I side with the gamers, and push for parental regulation over government regulation. My argument will revolve around current theories in parenting that urge for parents watching television with their children rather than plopping them in front of the T.V.—the argument there being that the television can be a source of education for the developing mind, but it is the responsibility of the parent to monitor how his or her child receives it. With the interactivity of video games, I argue, the potential gain is increased, but more problems arise, such as total immersion, desensitization, and subsequent rising levels of aggression, and thus the need for parental guidance is even greater. Supplementing my argument will be personal interviews with gamers to gather their perspective on the debate, to present the insider’s view on the subject, as well as excerpts from interviews with top figures in the fields of game design, game review, and game regulation.
I plan on submitting this article to the online journal, Gamestudies.org (http://www.gamestudies.org/) a self-proclaimed “international journal of computer game research.” Their focus is as follows:

Game Studies is a crossdisciplinary journal dedicated to games research, web-published several times a year at www.gamestudies.org. Our primary focus is aesthetic, cultural and communicative aspects of computer games.
Our mission - To explore the rich cultural genre of games; to give scholars a peer-reviewed forum for their ideas and theories; to provide an academic channel for the ongoing discussions on games and gaming.
This description, I think, is in keeping with the intention and subject matter of my article, and I believe that if I can manage to present my material in a clean, concise, and scholarly manner, they may publish it.

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